krista@veldarchitect.com

THE AGRITECT

A blog about all things rural and agritourism related

Mason Lane Farm, Kentucy


Tags: , , , ,     Categories: barn design, case studies

This farm, designed by de Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop is a great example of modern design, and rural culture coming together. The farm is located in Goshan, Kentucky.  The 2000-acre farm is used for agriculture, conservation, and recreation. The design is LEED Gold certified and has won many green design awards.

Two barns create a sheltered courtyard or farmyard (an important part of farm site design). The site is designed to capture water run-off in an organized fashion and direct it to collection and infiltration pools.  This reduces maintenance on gravel or asphalt laneways and farmyards and gutter cleanouts. The architects also mapped the equipment paths, wind patterns, and vegetation to assist with spacing the barns and orientation.

photos property of de Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop

Two barns create a sheltered courtyard or farmyard (an important part of farm site design). Both barns use natural, recycled, local, and low VOC (volatile organic compound that have hazardous off-gassing) materials.  They use the characteristics of the materials to emphasize the architectural design of the barns; i.e. dimensions of steel cladding seams correspond to column supports and window placement, making construction simple, reduces waste, and cuts costs.

photos property of de Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop

The open, but covered hay and equipment storage shed is built from locally sourced bamboo that is  tied together is a lattice pattern, reminiscent of the straw being stored inside.  The open lattice allows natural ventilation to keep the straw and hay dry.

photos property of de Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop

The workshop shed is clad in typical industrial corrugated steel cladding.  A-typical is the colour chosen; brown, a colour that matches nature and mimics the traditional wood barns. This barn uses the actual building materials as the ‘finished’ materials rather than covering them and purchasing additional finish materials. This enclosed shed houses the workshop and the farm managers house. This shed uses natural ventilation, passive heating, and natural daylighting to reduce electricity costs.

photos property of de Leon & Primmer Architecture Workshop

This farmyard and pair of barns are a great example of traditional methods working to accommodate new technologies and providing energy and cost saving benefits. They are beautifully designed and detailed, and stand beautifully in the landscape. This is a view from the agritect, what do you think?

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